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Parole Review Committeedeciding who is safe for release from prison

Photo courtesy of the Guernsey Press.

All the info

Summary

The Parole Review Committee is the independent body that makes decisions about:

  • whether prisoners are safe to be released early from prison, under strict supervision
  • whether those released on parole need to be returned to prison if they do not comply.

The Committee is made up of nine members, including the Chair.  Decisions are made by four members drawn from the Committee.

Responsibilities

You will be:

  • Reading and analysing complex background information
  • Meeting as a team to review cases
  • Making sound decisions that you can justify

Appointment process

From time to time, the Committee for Home Affairs advertises for new members of the Parole Review Committee to replace people who have stood down.

To apply, you will complete an application form and will be called for an interview if you are shortlisted.

You will be required to undertake an Enhanced Police Check prior to appointment.

Parole Review Committee members are appointed by the Royal Court. Only the Chairperson is appointed by the States of Deliberation.

 

Exclusions

You cannot be a Parole Review Committee member if you are:

  • a deputy
  • a member of the judiciary
  • employed in the criminal justice system
  • employed by the States of Guernsey

Skills

You don’t need any formal qualifications to join the Committee. Members are appointed for the qualities and experience they can bring to the role from their own lives.

You will need to demonstrate excellent communication skills, both written and oral. 

You will need to act with integrity and deal with sensitive information in a confidential manner.

Knowledge of the criminal justice system and experience in undertaking risk assessments is desirable.

Support and training

There is a comprehensive training programme for all new members. 

The training will introduce you to all aspects of the criminal justice process, including prison life and the role of the probation service.

Time commitment

Two or three afternoons a month (including reading time). The work is flexible, and you can arrange it to fit around other commitments. Meetings are scheduled five months in advance and you receive the paperwork two weeks in advance of the meeting.

You are appointed for twelve years, although you may step down at any time.

You must retire after twelve years or on your 70th birthday, whichever is sooner.

Remuneration

You can claim £76 per half-day for attending meetings.

Limited expenses will be reimbursed.

Rewards

You will be protecting the community by making important decisions on the future of people who have served the punishment part of their sentence. These decisions are vital in ensuring justice, fairness and the protection of the public.

Downsides

It is not a public facing role. The Committee meets in private and considers sensitive information which can sometime be onerous.

More information

If you are interested in the current vacancies for the Parole Review Committee (closing 31st January 2020), call Emily Grainger on 717359.

Download this information

To turn all of this information about the Parole Review Committee into a PDF, click the ‘download info as PDF’ button on the right of this page.
 
Corrections
 
This description of the role of Parole Review Committee member has been researched by Women in Public Life volunteers.  If you spot an error, please do let us know by emailing hello@womeninpubliclife.gg.

If you have a question about the Parole Review Committee that isn’t answered on this page, email us at hello@womeninpubliclife.gg.  We’ll research the answer and then publish it here to help inform others who might be curious about the same thing.

In brief…

The Parole Review Committee is the independent body that makes decisions about:

  • whether prisoners are safe to be released early from prison, under strict supervision
  • whether those released on parole need to be returned to prison if they do not comply.

The Committee is made up of nine members, including the Chair.  Decisions are made by four members drawn from the Committee.

From time to time, the Committee for Home Affairs advertises for new members to replace people who have stood down.

You don’t need any formal qualifications. You are appointed for the qualities and experience you bring from your own life. There is a comprehensive training programme.

The time commitment is two or three afternoons a month. The work is flexible, and you can arrange it to fit around your life. Meetings are scheduled five months in advance and you receive the paperwork two weeks in advance of the meeting.

There’s much more…

To read about the Parole Review Committee in detail, click the ‘download info as pdf’ button below.  Or change over to a laptop or tablet.